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Recent amendment expands employment protection for wounded warriors, disabled veterans

March 7, 2012 | By francesjohnson
[caption id="attachment_3555" align="alignright" width="300" caption="Recent changes to the Americans With Disabilities Act make it easier for wounded warriors and disabled veterans to be protected under the law."]
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VIRIN: 201001-N-XZ098-0058
A recent amendment to the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) makes it easier for veterans with a wide range of impairments to qualify for protections under the law and get the reasonable accommodations they need to successfully obtain and retain meaningful employment. Any wounded warrior or disabled veteran looking for a job in the private sector should acquaint themselves with these provisions and protections. According to the website of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the body that enforces the requirements of the ADA, the law defines an “individual with a disability” as anyone who: has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; has a record of such an impairment; or is regarded, or treated by an employer, as having such an impairment, even if no substantial limitation exists. Previous to the ADA Amendments Act of 2008, the law defined the term “disability” very narrowly, but now it is much easier for individuals with a wide range of impairments to establish that they are individuals with disabilities and are therefore entitled to protections under ADA. For example, under the amendment the term “major life activities” includes not only physical activities such as walking, seeing or hearing, but also other major bodily functions such as the operation of the brain and neurological system. This means that wounded warriors and veterans suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can now more easily seek protections under ADA as they look for and participate in employment opportunities. The EEOC provides an electronic Guide for Wounded Veterans, which answers a variety of questions that veterans with service-connected disabilities might have about the protections they qualify for under ADA.  Representatives from the EEOC were also on-hand during last week’s
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VIRIN: 201001-N-XZ098-0063
that outlines how employers can provide reasonable accommodations and how they can prevent disability-based discrimination. Employers are required under law to provide reasonable accommodations as long as they do not create an “undue hardship,” which is defined as significant difficulty or expense to the employer. During the employment conference bootcamp session, representatives from the EEOC did take care to stipulate that, while there are overarching rules and laws, many circumstances must be taken on a case-by-case basis, as there are exceptions to every rule. For example, while a disabled veteran coming to work with a service animal would be a reasonable accommodation in most workplaces, in a laboratory or medical environment with strict cleanliness and sterility requirements, a service animal could represent an undue hardship. Wounded warriors and disabled veterans are encouraged to contact the EEOC if they have a question about their specific circumstance, or if they would like to file a charge of discrimination. The EEOC representatives also clarified that it is not illegal for applications to ask you to indicate whether you are a “disabled veteran” as long as it is clearly stated on the application that the information is being used as part of the employer’s affirmative action program, that providing the information is voluntary, that failure to provide the information will not subject you to adverse treatment, and that the information will be kept confidential and used only in a way that complies with the ADA. Being aware of your rights and protections as a wounded warrior or disabled veteran will empower you in your search for employment, and will help you succeed in whatever career opportunity you choose. For more information about your rights under the ADA, you may also visit the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission website, contact the EEOC directly, search for the EEOC office nearest to you, or review a list of frequently asked questions.
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